Which caused the most trouble for China internal or external problems WHY?

Which created the most trouble for china, internal or external forces? Opium trade created the most problems for China. Because of opium addiction, the Chinese were forced to trade with Britain for this good. So many people were addicted, it sold on the street like candy.

What internal problems did China face?

The Chinese were economically self-sufficient. What internal problems did China face prior to the Taiping Rebellion? Growing population, poor harvests, corruption, growing opium addiction.

Why Can China resist outside influence?

China was able to reject these offers from the West because it was largely self- sufficient. The basis of this self-sufficiency was China’s healthy agricultural econ- omy. During the 11th century, China had acquired a quick-growing strain of rice from Southeast Asia.

Why did the Chinese have little interest in trading with the West and what changes that?

The Chinese had little interest for trading with the West because the west had nothing they wanted. They did not want foreign things to become part of their day to day life, so they isolated themselves. In fact, China had goods the west wanted, but the west didn’t have goods china wanted, so things didn’t work out.

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What importance did the sphere of influence have for China?

What importance did spheres of influence have for China? Spheres of influence were places where other countries had all the power. They controlled all the trade and exchange of goods in that area. In result, the citizens got mad that foreigners had more power than them.

Were internal or external problems the most trouble for China?

Which created the most trouble for china, internal or external forces? Opium trade created the most problems for China. Because of opium addiction, the Chinese were forced to trade with Britain for this good. So many people were addicted, it sold on the street like candy.

What caused Chinese famine?

Causes of the famine. The Great Chinese Famine was caused by a combination of radical agricultural policies, social pressure, economic mismanagement, and natural disasters such as droughts and floods in farming regions.

Why did China reject offers from the West?

Why did China reject offers from the west? China was largely self sufficient. They had quick growing rice, and they acquired maize, sweet potatoes, and peanuts from the Americas. … The British refused to stop trading opium so the British and Chinese went to battle.

How did China respond to imperial influence?

As a result of the Boxer Rebellion, China was subjected to even greater humiliation. … Overwhelmed by the Western military response, the Chinese were humiliated by having to pay reparations and allow concessions to the Western powers that effectively denied them control over their own country.

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How did the self strengthening movement affect China?

The Self-Strengthening Movement succeeded in securing the revival of the dynasty from the brink of eradication, sustaining it for another half-century. The considerable successes of the movement came to an abrupt end with China’s defeat in the First Sino-Japanese War in 1895.

What caused the global silver trade?

Contributing factors to the patterns of the global silver trade between 1550-1800 include large cities and ports, economic demand, and the use for government tax . … Cities and/or ports in South America, the Philippines, and China imported and exported silver, connecting the globe and spreading silver worldwide.

Why did they have little interest in trading with Europeans?

they had little interest in trading with the west because china was largely self-sufficient. … why do you think European powers established spheres of influence in china rather than colonies, as they did in Africa and other parts of Asia?

Why did China have little interest in trading with Europe?

Because China was practically self-sufficient, its emperors had little interest in trading with Europeans. … The Chinese regarded European goods as inferior to their own and bought little merchandise from the European merchants at Canton. By the late 1700’s, Europeans refused to kowtow (bow low) to the Chinese emperor.