Your question: Why did the Chinese guard secret of silk production so carefully?

Why did the Chinese keep silk-making methods a secret? They wanted to be the only people who knew how to make the valuable fabric. … In exchange for silk, traders returned with gold, silver, horses, and precious stones.

Why did the Chinese guard the secret of silk production so carefully the process was not perfected and not ready to share with others the knowledge?

Why did the Chinese guard the secret of silk production so carefully? … The knowledge would create too much bickering between silk manufacturers. The Silk Road would most likely collapse without silk production. The production generated great wealth for China as long as it was not shared.

Did the Chinese guarded their secret of the making of silk?

For thousands of years, the Chinese had a monopoly on the production of silk and guarded their secrets of sericulture very closely. … It’s therefore no surprise to find that the Chinese sought to protect their new found economic gem, resulting in sericulture becoming a closely monitored and almost secret art.

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Why was silk production so important to China?

Silk is a fabric first produced in Neolithic China from the filaments of the cocoon of the silk worm. It became a staple source of income for small farmers and, as weaving techniques improved, the reputation of Chinese silk spread so that it became highly desired across the empires of the ancient world.

How did the secret of silk get out?

The West finally cracked the secret in 552 CE when the Byzantine emperor Justinian sent two Nestorian monks to central Asia. The monks hit the eggs in their hollow bamboo staves. The eggs hatched into worms which then spun cocoons.

Why are the harvested silk cocoons boiled give two reasons?

To get the silk from the cocoons at the optimum time, before the worm makes a hole in the cocoon reducing it’s value, they are placed in boiling water to kill the worm and make it easier to unwrap the silk threads.

How did the Chinese discover silk?

According to Chinese legend, Empress His Ling Shi was first person to discover silk as weavable fibre in the 27th century BC. Whilst sipping tea under a mulberry tree, a cocoon fell into her cup and began to unravel. From there, silken garments began to reach regions throughout Asia. …

Why did China keep the process of silk making secret and for what purposes did they use silk?

Why did the Chinese keep silk-making methods a secret? They wanted to be the only people who knew how to make the valuable fabric. … In exchange for silk, traders returned with gold, silver, horses, and precious stones.

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How is silk produced today?

Silk is a natural protein fiber, some forms of which can be woven into textiles. The protein fiber of silk is composed mainly of fibroin and is produced by certain insect larvae to form cocoons.

Silk
Kanji
Kana シルク

Why is silk important today?

Silk is primarily used in garments and household items, but it is also employed in unexpected ways, such as in bicycle tires and in medicine. Silk is great for summer clothing because of its absorbent nature and how it wicks moisture, and it is also a staple for winter wear since it has low conductive properties.

What was the penalty for revealing the secrets of making silk?

But for thousands of years, the Chinese people kept the work of silkworms a secret. Death was the penalty for telling the secret. Long before the rest of the world learned how silk was made, the Chinese were trading this treasured fabric with people west of China.

How did silk get smuggled out of China?

Legend has it that two monks hid silkworm eggs inside a bamboo pole to smuggle them out of China, where they were guarded as closely as state secrets. The monks then presented the eggs to Byzantine Emperor Justinian I in Constantinople, where he created a thriving silk industry.

Who made silk?

According to Chinese myth, sericulture and the weaving of silk cloth was invented by Lady Hsi-Ling-Shih, the wife of the mythical Yellow Emperor who is said to have ruled China in about 3,000 BC. Hsi-Ling-Shi is credited with both introducing sericulture and inventing the loom upon which silk is woven.

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